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Table of Contents

 
Chapter 1:  Innovation – the Big Disruptor  9
1.1 Whirlpool Reinvents Itself 9
1.2 IBM Transforms Itself Into a Champion of Big Emerging Ideas 14
1.3  Innovate for survival 21
1.4  The Need for Fast Innovation 24
1.5  Invention is not Innovation and is not Serial Innovation 31
1.6 Conflicts and the Need for Balance 32
1.7 Deficiencies and Areas of Improvement 35
1.8 The World´s Most Innovative Companies 36
1.9 The Innovation Management System 37
1.10 Structure of this Book 38
1.11 Conclusions 41
   
Chapter 2: The Innovation Mix 43
2.1  Surprise Attack by Brise One Touch 43
2.2  The Sony Transistor Radio 45
2.3  New Business Modell: Zara “Cheap Chic – Fast Fashion” 46
2.4  Incremental Innovations or Radical Innovations? 51
2.5 Disruptive Innovations 56
2.6 Product Innovation or Business Model Innovation? 60
2.7 Conclusions 67
2.8 Business Model Worksheet 68
   
Chapter 3: The Starting Point: Vision, Objectives, Strategy 69
3.1 The Transformation of P&G Into a Serial Innovator 69
3.2 Microsoft: Successful Entry in Game Consoles 76
3.3 Why We Need a Vision 80
3.4 Innovation Objectives 82
3.5 Innovation Arena Strategy 86
3.6 Platform Strategy 91
3.7 Market Entry Strategy 95
3.8 Conclusions 100
3.9 Worksheet for Innovation Objectives (Examples 101
   
Chapter 4: Creating an Innovation Culture is Key 103
4.1 Innovation Culture à la Google 103
4.2 Excuse me: General Electric? 111
4.3 Structure vs. Chaos 116
4.4 Innovation-Conducive Values and Behavioural Norms 118
4.5 “Walk the Talk 121
4.6 Culture Clash: Routine vs. Innovation 123
4.7 Conclusions 126
4.8 Worksheet: Survey to Assess Innovation Culture 127
   
Chapter 5: Innovation Process: the Task Master  129
5.1 Nescafé Nespresso`s Long Way to Success 129
5.2 Innovation Machine Toyota: Nothing is Impossible 135
5.3 Common Objectives of Innovation Processes 141
5.4 The Basic Stage-Gate Process 143
5.5 Amendments to the Stage-Gate Process 147
5.6 The Milestone Process: Assumptions and Learnings 152
5.7 Decisions in the Innovation Process 157
5.8 Learning from failures 161
5.9 Conclusions 163
5.10 Worksheet: Assumption Chart 165
5.11 Worksheet: Reverse Income Statement 166
   
Chapter 6: Idea Generation and Idea Evaluation  167
6.1 The Birth of Crest Whitestrips 167
6.2 P&G vs. SC Johnson in the Duster Market 173
6.3 BMW Is a Master of Idea Sourcing

175

6.4 Big Ideas Are Needed 178
6.5 Existing Ideas vs. Original Ideas 180
6.6 Sources of Existing Ideas 183
6.7 The Creation of Original Ideas 188
6.8 Evaluation of Innovation Ideas 197
6.9 Conclusions 202
6.10 Worksheet for Innovation Opportunities 204
   
Chapter 7: And What Is the Reaction of the Customers?  207
7.1 Customer Obsession at Amazon 207
7.2 The “Sweet Spot” of Drano Power Gel 211
7.3 Unearthing Customer Insights 213
7.4 Total Quality in Market Research 220
7.5 Five Principles of Practical Market Research 222
7.6 Conclusions 225
   
Chapter 8: Value Maximization in the Innovation Cycle  227
8.1 Apple´s Rebirth: the iPod, iPhone, iPad 227
8.2 “Big Idea” Brise One Touch 233
8.3 When Is the Innovation “in the Market”? 235
8.4 Power Marketing During the Innovation Cycle 238
8.5 Sense of Urgency 240
8.6 Conclusions 245
   
Chapter 9: The Innovation Portfolio: Are We on the Right Track? 247
9.1 Can Pfizer Prevent the Sales Decline? 247
9.2 The Innovation Portfolio Requires Management 249
9.3 Objectives and Tools of the Innovation Portfolio Management 253
9.4 The Portfolio Review Meeting 256
9.5 A Pragmatic Approach 258
9.6 Conclusions 260
   
Chapter 10: Structure and Systems for Managing Innovations  261
10.1 The Innovation Fountain 3M 261
10.2 The IBM-Sony-Toshiba “Cell” Team 264
10.3 Formal Structure 266
10.4 Innovation Teams 275
10.5 Organizing for Incremental vs. Radical Innovations 282
10.6 Resource Allocation 286
10.7 Motivation & Reward 290
10.8 Systems 291
10.9 Conclusions 294
10.10 Checklist: Decisions on Structural and Systemic Alternatives 297
   
Chapter 11: Competencies of a Serial Innovator  299
11.1 Samsung Proclaims Design and Other Revolutions 299
11.2 Hyundai: Ready to Play the Pioneer? 306
11.3 Innovation Competencies: Develop or acquire? 311
11.4 Explicit vs. tacit knowledge 313
11.5 Different Types of Innovation Competencies 315
11.6 Building Innovation Competencies Fast 317
11.7 The New “Lateral” Leader 318
11.8 Conclusions 321
   
Chapter 12: Innovation in the Global Enterprise  323
12.1 P&G´s “Organization 2005” 323
12.2 SAP Spreads Its Innovation Management Globally 327
12.3 Structural Alternatives for Global Innovation Management 330
12.4 Alternative Product Development Approaches 337
12.5 Global Innovation Processes 340
12.6 Global Innovation Teams 342
12.7 Conclusions 348
   
Chapter 13: Change Management Towards a Serial Innovator  349
13.1 The Need for Change Management 349
13.2 Eight-Step Change Management Process 350
13.3 Analysis of Four Transformations: Whirlpool, IBM, P&G, GE 352
13.4 Conclusions 355
13.5 Checklist to Manage the Change Towards a Serial Innovator 356
   
Chapter 14: The Future Belongs to the Innovation Machines  359
 
Bibliography  361
A Books 361
B Magazine, Newspaper, Internet Articles 368
C. Company Publications 381
D. Case Studies 387
   
Index  389